Anatomy 2

Welcome to your Anatomy 2: Myology & Osteology Upper Extremity Quiz.

This quiz has 90 multiple choice questions. Make sure to mark an answer for every question!
You will get the results mailed to the email address indicated below!

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1. Muscles that attach anywhere to the margo medialis (including angulus superior and inferius) of the scapula are: m. rhomboideus minor and m. trapezius pars transversus.
2. Muscles that attach anywhere to the margo medialis (including angulus superior and inferius) of the scapula are: m. infraspinatus and m. levator scapulae.
3. Muscles that attach anywhere to the margo medialis (including angulus superior and inferius) of the scapula are: m. serratus anterior and m. rhomboideus major
4. Muscles that partially or totally attach to the clavicula are: m. deltoideus and m. sternocleidomastoideus.
5. Muscles that partially or totally attach to the clavicula are: m. pectoralis major and m. trapezius pars descendens.
6. Muscles that partially or totally attach to the clavicula are: m. subclavius and m. pectoralis minor.
7. Muscles that partially or totally insert to the tuberculum majus of the humerus are: m. infraspinatus and m. teres major.
8. Muscles that partially or totally insert to the tuberculum majus of the humerus are: m. supraspinatus and m. teres minor.
9. Muscles that partially or totally originate from the processus coracoideus of the scapula are: m. coracobrachilis and m. triceps (caput longum).
10. Muscles that partially or totally attach to the processus coracoideus of the scapula are: m. pectoralis minor and m. biceps caput breve.
11. The muscle belly of the m. flexor carpi ulnaris is positioned directly under the subcutis.
12. The muscle belly of the m. flexor carpi radialis is positioned directly under the subcutis.
13. The proximal part of the muscle belly of the m flexor digitorum superficialis is positioned directly under the subcutis.
14. The muscle belly of the m. flexor digitorum profundus is positioned directly under the subcutis.
15. The ulnar border of the anatomial sniffbox (tabatière anatomique) is the tendon the the m. extensor pollicis longus.
16. The radial border of the anatomical sniff box (tabatière anatomique) are the tendons of the m. extensor pollicis brevis and the m. abductor pollicis longus.
17. The m. flexor digitorum profundus inserts to the phalanges media of the fingers.
18. The m. flexor carpi radialis inserts to the basis ossis metacarpale IV
19. The m. flexor pollicis longus inserts to the proximal phalanx of the thumb.
20. The m. abductor pollicis longus inserts to the distal phalanx of the thumb.
21. The m. extensor carpi radialis longus inserts to the basis ossis metacarpale II.
22. Closing of the fingers at the carpo-metacarpal joints amongst others is cause by the contraction of the mm. interossi palmares.
23. Spreading of the fingers at the carpo-metacarpal joints amongst others is caused by contraction of the mm. interossei dorsales.
24. Flexion of the fingers at the carpo-metacarpal joints and simultaneously extension of the interphalangeal joints is caused by contraction of the mm. interossei.
25. The tendons of the m. flexor carpi ulnaris and the m. flexor carpi radialis run through the carpal tunnel.
26. The os pisiforme lies palmar (ventral) to the os triquetrum.
27. The os triquetrum lies ulnar to the os lunatum.
28. The os scaphoideum lies radial to the os lunatum.
29. The os scaphoideum lies proximal to the os trapezoideum.
30. The os hamatum lies radial to the os capitatum.
31. The os hamatum has direct contact with at least 5 carpal or metacarpal bones.
32. The os capitatum has direct contact with the os trapezium.
33. The os hamatum has direct contact with both the os metacarpale I and II.
34. The os trapezium has direct contact with both os metacarpale IV & V.
35. If you palpate proximally to the os metacarpale III, you will arrive at the os capitatum.
36. You place your finger at the tuberculum major humeri just lateral to the acromion. Amongst others, under your finger you will find:

  1. The fascia subdeltoidea

  2. The m. supraspinatus

37. You place your finger at the tuberculum major humeri just lateral to the acromion. Amongst others, under your finger you will find:

  1. The bursa subdeltoidea

  2. The capsule of the AC-joint

38. You place your finger at the tuberculum major humeri just lateral to the acromion. Amongst others, under your finger you will find:

  1. The m. deltoideus

  2. The m. teres major

39. You place your finger at the tuberculum minor humeri. Amongst others, under your finger you will find:

  1. The m. deltoideus

  2. The m. subscapularis

40. The proximal part the sulcus intertubercularis humeri is positioned medially to the tuberculum minor humeri.
41. The processus coracoideus scapulae is positioned medially to the tuberculum minor humeri.
42. An art. plana and art. trochoidea have only one axis of rotation.
43. A ginglimus and art. ellipsoidea have only one axis of rotation.
44. An art. sellaris and art. spheroidea have only two axes of rotation.
45. The humeroradial joint is functionally an art. ellipsoidea.
46. The humeroradial joint is morphologically a ginglimus.
47. The humeroulnar joint is morphologically an art. cilindrica.
48. The humeroulnar joint is functionally a ginglimus.
49. The distal radioulnar joint is morphologically and art. cilindrica.
50. The distal radioulnar joint is functionally and art. ellipsoidea.
51. The proximal radioulnar joint is morphologically an art. cilindrica.
52. The proximal radioulnar joint is functionally an art. trochoidea.
53. The radiocarpal joint is morphologically a restricted ball and socket joint.
54. The radiocarpal joint is functionally an art. spheroidea.
55. The mediocarpal/midcarpal joint is morphologically an irregular joint.
56. The carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is morphologically an art. ellipsoidea.
57. The carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is functionally a limited art. sellaris.
58. The MCP joints (II - V) are functionally limited artt. spheroideae.
59. The PIP-joints are morphologically and functionally hinge joints.
60. The only movement possible at the humeroradial joint is pronation and supination.
61. The movements possible at the humeroulnar joint is pronation/supination and flexion/extension.
62. The only movement possible at the proximal radioulnar joint is pronation and supination.
63. Pronation and supination of the forearm occurs partially at the radiocarpal joint.
64. During flexion or extension of the proximal phalanges of the fingers at the MCP-joints, they also rotate (more or less) around their longitudinal axis.
65. Flexion of the thumb is a movement at the MCP I joint parallel to the plane of the palm of the hand.
66. The range of movement of flexion in the carpometacarpal joint (V) is greater than that in carpometacarpal joint (II).
67. During radial deviation of the index finger and ulnar deviation of the pinky, these fingers also rotate around their transversal axes.
68. Passive flexion at the elbow joint is possibly limited by bone to bone approximation.
69. Extension at the elbowjoint is mostly limited by bone to bone approximation.
70. Pronation of the forearm is probably limited by compression of the deep flexors between the radius and ulna.
71. Amongst others, supination of the forearm is limited by tension of the membrana interossea.
72. During compression at the hand (supported posture by arms) the membrana interossea conducts part of this force over the ulna to the humerus.
73. During traction at the hand (hanging posture) the chorda obliqua is tight and prevents luxation of the caput radii out of the lig. anulare radii.
74. Spreading of the fingers at the MCP-joints is limited by, amongst others, the lig. metacarpeum transversum superficialis.
75. Passive extension of the fingers at the MCP- and IP-joints (while the wrist and elbow are slightly flexed) is limited by passive insufficiency of the fingerflexors.
76. Passive dorsiflexion of the wrist (while the fingers and elbow are extended) is probably limited by ligaments and the capsule of the wrist joint.
77. Passive palmarflexion of the wrist (while the fingers are relaxed) is probably limited by passive insufficiency of the finger extensors.
78. Amongst others, many of the superficial ventral forearm muscles originate from the medial epicondylus.
79. Amongst others, many of the deep dorsal forearm muscles originate from the lateral epicondylus.
80. Amongst others, the function of the m. brachialis is pronation.
81. Amongst others, the origin of the m. pronator teres is the medial epicondyle.
82. The insertion of the m. flexor carpi radialis is the distal end of the os metacarpale III.
83. Amongst others, the function of the m. brachioradialis is palmarflexion of the wrist.
84. Amongst others, the origin of the m. flexor digitorum profundus is the ventral side of the radius and ulna.
85. The insertion of the m. abdutor pollicis longus is the proximal end of the proximal phalanx of the thumb.
86. Amongst others, the function of the m. flexor digitorum superficialis is ulnar deviation of the metacarpophalangeal joints II - V.
87. Amongst others, the origin of the m. brachialis is the lateral margin of the humerus.
88. The insertion of the m. extensor carpi radialis longus is the distal end of the os metacarpale III.
89. Amongst others, the function of the m extensor carpi radialis longus is radial deviation at the wrist joint.
90. The insertion of the m. extensor carpi ulnaris is the proximal end of the os metacarpale V.